The Chicago Film Society Presents

Mon, Feb 19th, 2018
Mon, Mar 26th, 2018

The Chicago Film Society comes to the Music Box for special presentations, all on glorious celluloid. The programs classic features, underseen rarities, cult films, short subjects, trailer reels and more.

ABOUT THE CHICAGO FILM SOCIETY
The Chicago Film Society makes rare and classic films available to local audiences in their original forms—on 35mm and 16mm motion picture film. Our screenings spotlight the restoration efforts of archives, studios, and private collectors, as well as the experience of seeing films projected in a theater with an audience. Through an array of program notes, extended blog entries, and introductory remarks before each screening, the Chicago Film Society endeavors to bring new notions of the cultural and material history of cinema to the public. The Chicago Film Society is a 501©(3) non-profit organization. It was established by Julian Antos, Becca Hall, and Kyle Westphal in 2011.

For more information on The Chicago Film Society, visit www.chicagofilmsociety.org

PRICING

Tickets are $10, and can be purchased at the Music Box on the night of the presentation. Advance Tickets may be available for certain programs, check individual film links for details.

CLICK HERE for Advance Tickets to TWO WEEKS IN ANOTHER TOWN

Movies & Showtimes for
The Chicago Film Society Presents

Mon, Oct 9th
Smithereens

7:00PM
BUY TICKETS

Mon, Nov 27th
Dick Tracy

7:00PM
BUY TICKETS

Tue, Jan 9th
The Heartbreak Kid

7:00PM
BUY TICKETS

Mon, Feb 19th
Two Weeks in Another Town

7:00PM
BUY TICKETS

Dick Tracy

A FILM BY: Warren Beatty
WRITTEN BY: Chester Gould (characters), Jim Cash
STARRING: Warren Beatty, Madonna, Al Pacino

***Music Box Members get in free by showing their membership cards at the box office an hour before the show***

CLICK HERE for Advance Tickets

Presented by The Chicago Film Society

If Beetlejuice can step into the cap and cowl of the Dark Knight, why can’t John Reed play Chester Gould’s comic strip crime-stopper? A long-gestating project (Alain Resnais was briefly attached to direct) that finally hit theaters after Tim Burton’s BATMAN had fatally altered the blockbuster paradigm, DICK TRACY was the first film to gross $100 million and still be judged a flop. Revisited today, it’s a romantic, auteur-driven take on the comic book movie, and the road not traveled for an increasingly bottom-line-obsessed genre. While Marvel and DC efforts are forever teasing the next chapter in their cinematic universes, DICK TRACY crams in so many incidents and villains (Itchy! 88 Keys! The Rodent! Flattop! Pruneface! Dustin Hoffman as Mumbles! Al Pacino, an Oscar nominee, as Big Boy Caprice!) as to make a sequel unfathomable and mildly nausea-inducing. And no subsequent comic book movie has been as invested in working within the parameters of its four-color source material, faithfully recreated and deliriously explored through Richard Sylbert’s production design and Vittorio Storaro’s cinematography. For all the pyrotechnics, though, it’s mostly an emotionally direct, stirringly simple movie about Dick Tracy fitfully trying to be a better boyfriend. With songs by Stephen Sondheim, singing by Madonna, and spittle-flecked mugging from everyone else.

35mm print from Chicago Film Society collections
BONUS: Preshow Cartoon - Roger Rabbit in “Roller Coaster Rabbit” (Frank Marshall & Rob Minkoff, 1990, 7 mins, 35mm)

Technical Information

Production Year: 1990
Country of Origin: United States
Language: English
Run Time: 105 mins
Format: 35mm

The Heartbreak Kid

A FILM BY: Elaine May
WRITTEN BY: Neil Simon, Bruce Jay Friedman (story)
STARRING: Charles Grodin, Jeannie Berlin, Eddie Albert, Cybill Shepherd

Presented by The Chicago Film Society

Introduced by Joe Swanberg

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Elaine May's Hollywood directing career may have been unjustly cut short by the financial failure of 1987's ISHTAR, but the four narrative features she currently has to her name are all essential. THE HEARTBREAK KID may be her only film to feature a screenplay by somebody else but the seething, brutally pointed line-readings from which the film derives most of its comic energy are all May. Charles Grodin plays Lenny Cantrow, a Jewish newlywed on his honeymoon in Miami Beach with wife Lila (May's daughter Jeannie Berlin) who sets his sights on Midwestern Gentile coed Kelly (Cybill Shepherd), ignoring the inconveniences of Kelly's ever-present father (an apoplectic Eddie Albert) and Lenny's own very recent marriage. Given May's astonishing gift for comedic timing, it's no surprise that each of THE HEARTBREAK KID's four principals gives an astonishing and hilarious performance, nor that May is triumphantly successful in making a masterpiece unlike anything seen in the American cinema before or since: a sunny, light anti-romantic comedy that manages to be one of the bleakest films of the 1970s.

35mm print courtesy of the Academy Film Archive.

Technical Information

Production Year: 1972
Country of Origin: United States
Language: English
Run Time: 106 mins
Format: 35mm

Lust in the Dust

A FILM BY: Paul Bartel
WRITTEN BY: Philip John Taylor
STARRING: Tab Hunter, Divine, Lainie Kazan
 
One of the most overlooked talents to come out Roger Corman’s AIP director mill, Paul Bartel continued to make his own sort of unfashionable, high-concept, and decidedly independent B-pictures well into the ’90s. Bartel’s Western-comedy LUST IN THE DUST may have been advertised as something akin to a queer BLAZING SADDLES, but in its ambling, affable way, it is far more faithful to the genre’s B-movie roots than most of the Westerns produced during the revisionist heyday. Reuniting gay icons Tab Hunter and Divine, previously seen together in John Waters’s POLYESTER, LUST IN THE DUST is ostensibly concerned with a love triangle between Hunter’s gunslinger Abel Wood, Divine’s chorus girl-cum-prostitute Rosie Velez, and saloon-owner Marguerita (Lainie Kazan). There’s some nonsense about a search for gold, but Bartel is most excited just to play in his genre sandbox, trying on tropes and casting off any useless seriousness. 
 
Short: "The Secret Cinema” (Paul Bartel, 1966, 30min, 16mm) 
“The Secret Cinema” has been newly restored by the Academy Film Archive and The Film Foundation with funding provided by The George Lucas Family Foundation.

Technical Information

Production Year: 1985
Country of Origin: United States
Language: English
Run Time: 84 mins
Format: 35mm

Smithereens

A FILM BY: Susan Seidelman
WRITTEN BY: Susan Seidelman, Ron Nyswaner, Peter Askin
STARRING: Susan Berman, Brad Rinn

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Susan Seidelman’s feature film debut SMITHEREENS is the meaner, younger sister of her cult classic DESPERATELY SEEKING SUSAN. Released 3 years prior and funded in part by the money her grandmother left her for her “future wedding,” it was shot without permits on the streets of Koch-era New York City (sorry Grandma) and went on to become the first American independent feature selected to compete at Cannes.

Susan Berman stars as Wren, a New Jersey runaway who heads to NYC seeking fame in the punk scene, and whose limited talents include pasting Xeroxed self portraits of herself around town, and pinballing back and forth between sweet (but decidedly NOT punk) Brad Rinn, and sexy (real life punk icon) Richard Hell. With a soundtrack soaked in the Feelies, ESG, and the Voidoids and screening in a newly struck 35mm print, this is the New Wave cult film your horrible teenage self should have shoplifted from the video store.

Short: “Punking Out” (Maggi Carson, Juliusz Kossakowski, and Fredric A. Shore, 1979) – 16mm – 25 min
“Punking Out” courtesy of the Reserve Film and Video Collection of The New York Public Library for the Performing Arts. “Punking Out” has been preserved with funding from the Carnegie Corporation of New York.

Technical Information

Production Year: 1982
Country of Origin: United States
Language: English
Run Time: 89 mins
Format: 35mm

Two Weeks in Another Town

A FILM BY: Vincente Minnelli
WRITTEN BY: Charles Schnee (screenplay), Irwin Shaw (novel)
STARRING: Kirk Douglas, Edward G. Robinson, Cyd Charisse

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Presented by Chicago Film Society

Adapted from a free-standing novel by Irvin Shaw but effectively retrofitted by director Vincente Minnelli, screenwriter Charles Schnee, producer John Houseman, star Kirk Douglas, and composer David Raksin as a spiritual sequel to their own Oscar-winning Tinsel Town satire THE BAD AND THE BEAUTIFUL, TWO WEEKS IN ANOTHER TOWN is a mad melodrama that charts Hollywood’s decline while frolicking in the detritus. Douglas stars as Jack Andrus, the Serious Actor discharged from a high-end sanitarium after a cablegram calls him to Rome for two weeks of work at Cinecitta under the direction of longtime collaborator Maurice Kruger (Edward G. Robinson). Upon his arrival, Andrus finds sun-dappled seaside rot: a runaway production that Kruger cannot control, dub-happy actors speaking past each other in different languages on the set, crass financiers who don’t give a damn about showmanship. Like a Henry James story turned inside out, this Metrocolor debauchery circus plays American neuroses against European cynicism and everybody comes up plastered. Shot immediately after Minnelli’s own deeply demoralizing experience on the international co-production THE FOUR HORSEMEN OF THE APOCALYPSETWO WEEKS IN ANOTHER TOWN plays like a documentary that really wants to be a psychodrama instead, a craggly self-portrait rounded up to Greek tragedy. With supporting turns from Cyd Charisse, Claire Trevor, and George Hamilton.

35mm print provided by Warner Bros.

Includes the Short Film: Production Featurette for THE CARDINAL (Otto Preminger, 1963) – 35mm Technicolor – 8 min

Technical Information

Production Year: 1962
Country of Origin: United States
Language: English
Run Time: 107 mins
Format: 35mm

Music Box Theatre

3733 N Southport Ave Chicago, IL 60613 773 871 6604